Insurance Shows Link Between Prescription Viagra And Lower Chance Of Illness | Daily Liberal

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news, health, health, cosmos magazine, science, Ellen Phiddian, Viagra, Alzheimer’s disease

Viagra is used by millions of people each year to treat erectile dysfunction. But new research shows that it may not only be useful in the bedroom – there is a suggestion that Viagra may also help prevent Alzheimer’s disease. It was originally developed to treat angina – although it has not passed trials – and there is some evidence that it could help treat malaria. Tadalafil, a drug similar to Viagra, has been suggested as a treatment for heart failure. An article in Nature Aging further expanded its potential, using insurance claims records to examine the link between Viagra and Alzheimer’s disease. The researchers, based in the United States, examined the insurance records of 7.23 million people, as well as genetic and other biological data. They looked at the data to extract indicators of Alzheimer’s disease, then looked at the relationship between those indicators and more than 1,600 prescribed drugs. Viagra had the strongest link to reducing the risk of Alzheimer’s disease, its prescription being associated with a 69 percent reduced risk of the disease. You may also like: Researchers point out that while this link is significant, it does not establish causation: Viagra may prevent Alzheimer’s disease, or it may be that people who have less biological precursors of Alzheimer’s disease are also more likely to receive a prescription for Viagra. There could also be other confounding factors involved. Sildenafil, for example, is more likely to be prescribed to wealthy people, and wealthy people are also less likely to get Alzheimer’s disease. The sample size of Viagra users was also – unsurprisingly – predominantly male. “Overall, the association between the use of sildenafil and the decrease in the incidence of AD [Alzheimer’s disease] does not establish causation or its direction, “the researchers write in their paper.” Our results therefore warrant rigorous clinical trials on the efficacy of treatment of sildenafil in patients with AD, including both sexes and controlled by placebo. “

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